Tip #25: Make Your Presentation Come Alive

Five days ago I watched as Tom took first place in the Toastmasters International Speech Contest. He practiced a technique that only a few out of one hundred speakers use.

Speech Delivery Tip #25: Act out your Presentation

During his Speech Tom used several phrases:

"Men took off their suit coats and threw them down."

"Audience rushed out."

"The Speaker pointed at the audience"

 

Good action sentences. However, Tom acted out every single one. He woound up and pretend to spike a suit coat. He rushed to one side of the stage to give us a visual of the audience rushing out. When he talked about the speaker pointing at the audience, he pointed at us also.

The result? His speech came alive, the audience's attention was held throughout the speech, and it was very memorable.

How can you act out your next presentation? Look through your speech and see what you can act out.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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When you are preparing a speech, what is your first step? Do you brainstorm a topic, make an outline, or research? Consider this next speaking tip:

Speech Preparation Tip #24: Find your Chris and Prepare the Speech for Chris.

Several months ago I spoke to about 50 energetic jr. highers. As I was preparing, I selected another jr higher in the area whom I’ll call Chris. He was a good representative of the audience I was speaking to. I prepared speech as if I was giving it to Chris.
 
I asked myself several questions.
 
  • What problems does Chris have?
  • What would keep Chris’s attention?
  • What info will help Chris?
I kept asking these questions and prepared a customized keynote for Chris. Yes, audiences are diverse and I did seek to add material to target the whole room because of the various backgrounds of the audience.
 
However, by focusing on one person it allowed me give a specific speech tailored for that audience. The result? Great interaction and a keynote that hit home.
 
Simple principle but very powerful.
 
Here are a few public speaking tips on preparing to speak to one person:
 
  • Select someone you know who represents the audience.
  • Ask yourself, “What would I say if it was just this individual in the room?”
  • Tailor the speech so it appeals to and impacts the diversity of people in the room.
  • Prepare for one, but appeal to all

 

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Ug! That's what I thought after hearing myself on tape. I had just recorded a presentation and was listening to it. Every "um", awkward pause, and misspoken word flew out off the mp3 and smacked me.

Listening or watching yourself on tape can be painful. That's why many speakers never record themselves. But wait! If the audience had to sit through it, so should we!

Speaking Tip #23: Improve your Speaking Skills fast by recording and listening to every presentation–twice.

What are the benefits of recording and listening/watching yourself?

  • What get's evaluated get's improved. Just by listening to ourself we will improve automatically.
  • Our errors will jump out at us and we can fix them.
  • Minor adjustments  will become clear.

When I started videotaping, I noticed I would often lick my lips and even wrinkled my forehead in an almost glaring way. The video camera gave me the brutal truth.

You can grab a digital recorder for anywhere from $30 to $100. Amazon is a great place to check. Flip phone cameras are between $100-$200. If you are serious about improving your public speaking skills, pick one up.

Why listen twice?

The first time you listen, evaluate yourself. What could your improve? What should you have left out? During the second time, just let it play as you do something else. I have been told that even if you are distracted, your subconscious mind is still picking it up.

Still not convinced about the power of recording your presentation? Try it on your next three presentations. Then compare your first presentation to the third. You'll notice a difference.

Grab your recorder and start taking your public speaking skills to a new level.

 

 

 

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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You've grabbed attention with a great opening. The audience now has a brief idea of what to expect. It's time to share why they should listen.

Public Speaking Tip #21: Share compelling reasons to listen.

If you are a big name celebrity or have accomplished something newsworthy, people will readily listen to you. However, for the rest of us, we need to give the audience compelling reasons to listen. Here are a couple ways.

Promise

When you leave here today, you will know a five minute method for setting goals which will propel you up the ladder of success.

Give a couple promises up front. Don't forget to follow through on them.

Benefits

What is the difference between benefits & features?

Features describe the car.

Benefits are the improvements in your life because you bought the car.

Feature: You will learn a goal setting method.

Benefit: After today, You'll be able to reach your goals fast.

Proof

The university of _______________ studied 50 people and found that individuals using this goal setting method, attained 85% of their goals.

I shared this system with my friend Sam. He was able to stop smoking in three weeks.

You can use social proof, authority proof like a quote, or research proof. Do what it takes to give reasons for them to listen.

You can write a good speech intro. Just remember to grab attention, preview the speech, and share compelling reasons for them to listen.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Your speech intro is one of the most critical parts of your presentation.

During these essential few minutes, you want to do three things:

– Grab Attention

– Preview the speech

– Share compelling reasons why the audience should listen to you.

Over the next couple days, we'll be tackle each one of these.

Good Speech Intro Tip #19: Grab their attention with a question, a story, or a startling statement.

Any one of these will get the audience involved and ready to pay attention.

Starting with a Question

Do you remember a time when your were very discouraged or disappointed?

Would this question grab the audience's attention? Definitely, I've used it several times with great success. Three points to remember when asking questions.

First, ask it to one person. Look at one person and ask the question. Second, phrase the question so it is "you" focused. Third, pause after the question to let people reflect on it. One of the World Champions of Public Speaking said, "If they reflect, you will connect."

Starting your speech with a Story

Two years ago, I was…

Stories are an excellent way to grab attention. Just jump right in. No need for clutter phrases like "Here is something interesting that happened to me" or "Now, I will tell you a story." Dive into the story and let the story grab the audience's attention.

Starting with Startling Statement

Last year 11,773 People were killed by drunk drivers. That's like two 747 Jumbo Jets crashing every month.

Did this grab your attention? Think of true, but startling statements to open your speech.

 

Take some extra time to create a good speech intro with this speaking tip.

 

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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On a warm summer day, I was out riding the lawn mower around the yard. As you know mowing the lawn can be a low concentration task leaving plenty time for daydreaming and/or speech rehearsal.

If you had been standing there, you would have seen my lips move as I worked around the yard. I was applying this next speech preparation tip:

Tip #18: Practice your speech while distracted.

If you and I rehearse a presentation in our living room or office, we can be maybe 90-95% focused on the speech. However, practicing the speech while distracted and suddenly your concentration may drop to 50% or lower.

This makes it more difficult for us to rehearse the speech and thus prepares us for the presentation.

How can you practice your next presentation while distracted.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Tip #14: How to have Good Eye Contact

On a Tuesday evening, I plugged my camcorder into the TV, and carefully screened my latest speech. One fact jumped out at me. My eye contact was too congested. If the audience had been a slice of bread and my eye contact the peanut butter, there would have been gaps the size of the Nevada Dessert. Do you connect with all members of the audience?

Public Speaking Tip #14: Spread your eye contact to every section of the audience.

As mentioned elsewhere, it is good to have eye contact for 5-8 seconds with each person. You don't have to look at each person, just hit every section of the audience. When you look at one person, the people around feel like you are speaking right to them. Hit all corners, the front, the back, the middle. If you struggle in this area, try doing a figure eight with your eyes. Start in the back on the right side, move to the center back, the left back, the middle, right front, etc. It takes practice, but this is how you have good eye contact and connect with the audience.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Tip #10: How to have Vocal Variety

In high school I was chosen to be a narrator for the spring concert. Confidently I stood on stage and delivered to several hundred people. My speech was clear, easy to listen to, but lacked vocal variety. The music director told me I was emphasizing every single word. It is like having a sentence with every word in caps.

This made me easy to understand but can quickly bore the audience.

What’s the answer?

Presentation Tip #10: Only Emphasize 2-3 Words in a Sentence.

Look at the following sentence:

To be successful you need to have goals and a plan to reach them.

If you were delivering it, you might say:

To be successful you need to have goals and a plan to reach them.

In High-school I delivered this line like this:

To be successful you need to have goals and a plan to reach them.

Every word was emphasized. You can improve your voice and vocal variety by following Patricia Fripp’s advice: emphasize 2-3 words a sentence.

To emphasize a word, change how you say it. Even pause for a micro second beforehand. This subtle shift in your voice will cause the words to stand out.

Record yourself before and after. You’ll notice the extra vocal variety and your audience will love you for it.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Tip #4: How to Write a Good Speech Intro

You have 30 seconds to capture the audience’s attention and convince them to listen. If we fail, we may never fully gain a connection and the audience’s attention. Speaker trainers emphasize the vital importance of having a good speech intro that hooks the audience.

But how can we hook the audience and reel them into our speech?

Tip #4: Use the Hook and Reel Intro

The Hook and Reel Intro is a powerful intro formula which grabs the audiences  attention and reels them right into our speech. Get a free report on the Hook and Reel Intro.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Million Dollar Speaking Habits

What makes one person successful and another person unsuccessful? Brian Tracy claims the answer is simple. Successful people have successful (million dollar) habits. In his book Million Dollar Habits, Brian lists the habits a person must have to be successful.

I realized the same principle applies to speakers.

Successful speakers have million dollar speaking habits.

After some brain storming, here are a list of 10 habits we should have as speakers (Feel free to share your thoughts). Having these may not make us a million dollars, but it will help make us incredible speakers.

#1: Be passionate about our message.

#2: Be audience focused and truly desire to serve/help them.

#3: Know and research the audience before every speech.

#4: Give a clear organized presentation.

#5: Have one main point or foundational phrase.

#6: End on time.

#7: Speak to one person

#8: Prepare well.

#9: Give a $10,000 speech every time.

#10: Review and evaluate every presentation.

Developing These Habits

On the right side of my computer desktop is a shortcut to a file with a list of million dollar speaking habits. Every time I prepare, I seek to glance through and implement the habits. Why?

Time + Consistent Action = New habit.

Soon these habits will be almost second nature.

What other habits could we include?

(C) Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

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