A dry mouth can really hinder a presentation or conversation. In part 1, I shared 4 dry mouth solution tips. Here are 5 more dry mouth tips to help you when conversing or speaking from the stage.

#5: Lightly bite your tongue.

By lightly biting your tongue, you’ll find your mouth starts producing more saliva. Here again it is important that your body be hydrated.

#6: Use Sugar Free Candy

Many famous people will keep candy or lozenge in their mouth if they have problems with a dry mouth. Check with your pharmacy if you wish for specially made ones. Lemon flavored often helps. Unless you have an extreme dry mouth, remove it before you stand up to speak.

#7: Sleep with a Humidifier

A humidifier puts water into the air. In the winter the air becomes drier and can irritate the throat and dry out the mouth. Breathing in this moist air at night can prepare you for the public speaking event.

#8: Learn how to Overcome Fear of Public Speaking and Social Anxiety

Think of a good speaker that you know. Likely at one time this person experience stage fright, fear of public speaking, and speaking anxiety. At one point they learned how to overcome this fear.

You can do the same. Take time to read and study how to overcome public speaking fear and anxiety. There are several good public speaking programs that can help you.

#9: Using Breathing Exercises to Relax.

Good breathing exercises will help you relax and thus it make it easier for your body to keep your mouth, tongue, and throat moist. Breath in for a count of 3, hold for a count of 3 and breathe out for a count of 6. Repeat.

Before you speak, seek to be breathing your nose as to not dry out your mouth.

Dry mouth affects nearly every speaker. Use these 9 dry mouth solutions, and it will help you keep the saliva flowing so you can captivate the audience and speak with confidence.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

It’s your turn to talk, but suddenly your mouth has no saliva. Your tongue feels like a piece of wood in your mouth and it’s very tough to talk clearly. You have experienced symptoms of a dry mouth.

What Causes a Dry Mouth?

Generally, a dry mouth is caused by either a medical/physical condition or is a symptom of stage fright, social anxiety or fear of public speaking. Check with your doctor if you believe you have a medical or physical condition.

 If you only get a dry mouth when you are about to speak, likely its caused by speaking nervousness or anxiety. Suddenly we find our saliva glands are not working and our mouth feels dry.

Every speaker has gone through it at times. Experienced speakers know how to prevent a dry mouth and often use many of these 9 dry mouth tips.

Tip #1: Stay hydrated 24 hrs before you have to speak.

Experts recommend drinking 8-12 glasses of water a day. If you are speaking at 4:00 on Tuesday, you want to make sure you are drinking plenty of water for 24 hrs prior to this time.

A voice coach told me that this is critical to keep your voice cords lubricated. Drinking during your speech is not good enough. You must be drinking leading up to the speech.

#2: Sip water before and during your speech.

Advanced speakers and musicians are constantly sipping water during the presentation. This is for their vocal cords, but also helps with a dry mouth. Have a bottle or glass of water handy during your speech.

Consider using the restroom minutes before you speak, so you don’t have an urge to go during the presentation.

#3: Prepare your presentation or talk well.

Good preparation can help you overcome public speaking fear and anxiety by 80%. If you are meeting your boss or another VIP, spend a large amount of time preparing. Know your speech well. Role play the meeting. Do this and you’ll have less speaking anxiety

#4: Visualize biting into a lemon.

Your 60 seconds away from starting your presentation and your moth is drier than the Nevada Desert. No water in sight. What do you do? Visualize biting into a lemon. Think about a nice juicy lemon and mentally take a bite. Feel the sourness and juices. Your saliva glands will open up and the saliva will flow.

A dry mouth caused by speaking anxiety is common. Use these  4 dry mouth tips and you’ll be able to speak with confidence.  In part 2 of you’ll learn 5 more dry mouth solutions.
 

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

Improve Public Speaking Skills Fast - Evaluating Do you want to improve your public speaking skills fast with minimal effort? You can with this powerful public speaking tip.

Unfortunately, very few individuals use it, but those who do, improve very rapidly and become star presenters.

Here is the key:

Evaluate yourself after every talk.

Studies and experience have shown that if you just observe and evaluate an area of your life, you will automatically improve.

Just a week ago, I gave a 30 minute public speaking presentation. After the presentation, I applied these three steps:

Step #1: I asked three questions

What went well about the presentation?
What could I have done better?
How will I do better next time?

Notice how all three are stated in the positive. We get what we focus on. If we always dwell on the negative, it’s like running a race looking backwards. We want to acknowledge the weak points, but focus on the strengths and how to improve for our next speech.

Here were my answers (To start with I encourage you to just focus on a few suggestions in each category):
 

  • I was prepared and had my speech written out.
  • The introduction grabbed the audience’s attention.
  • I had great vocal variety

 

  • Pause more
  • Have a stronger conclusion
  • Improve my links between points

 

 

  • I will pause more through the presentation
  • I will practice my conclusion several times and make it strong.
  • In my notes I will write out a good link word for word

Step #2: Record your presentation and listen to it.

This step works well with the first one. Just listening to or watching yourself on tape is powerful for personal growth. Darren Lacroix, 2001 world champion of public speaking said, “Listening to yourself is one of the most powerful methods for improvement.”

Is it painful? Yes! They had to listen to it, so should we.

Often we may think we did better than we actually did. Seeing or hearing ourselves corrects our thinking. Sometimes we may think we did worse than we actually did. Recording is very helpful.

There have been times I thought I failed miserably on stage. However, after watching I saw it went pretty well. However, the opposite has also been true!

I recommend listening to your talk twice. Does it take time? Yes! Is it worth it? Definitely!

Step #3: Ask for honest feedback

Do you watch American Idol? Have you noticed how some singers truly think they are great and have been told they are great all their life by friends and family? However, on the show they meet the sharp edge of reality hears the truth from the judges.

If only someone had been honest or they had sought honest feedback, they could have been prevented public embarrassment.

We need honest feedback. Ask your spouse or a respected individual in the audience for their thoughts. You want someone who can be blunt, but encouraging. I’ll often use two questions:

1.    What are a few things I did well?
2.    What can I improve on for next time?

This way they can be both positive and helpful. Sincerely thank them. What they tell you may prevent future public speaking embarrassment.

You can rapidly improve your public speaking skills. Evaluate yourself after every performance and you will steadily improve.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

Good Speech Writing Tip: Best Way to Write a Speech

Here is a good speech writing tip that will easily make your speeches and presentations higher quality. Your audience will likely notice a difference immediately.  

Most people do not use this speaking tip and thus miss out on the power.

Here it is:

Be ready to give your speech 4 days before the actual date.

In other words if you are speaking on Saturday, you want to be ready to give it on Tuesday. Have your notes ready and speech practiced. Will it take lots of self-discipline? Sure, but don’t overlook the power of this good speech writing technique.

Do you just ignore the speech during those four days? No. Glance through it a couple times and even do some editing. You’ll have some amazing tweaks come to mind during those four days. Your presentation will be more apt to captivate the crowd.

There are several benefits:
 

  • We rarely get our best work done with a deadline looming. Sure speechwriting deadlines motivates, but the quality may not be the best.
  • A presentation becomes much less stressful because we are adequately prepared. 
  • We unlock the power of the subconscious mind. As your presentation bounces around in the back of your subconscious mind for a few days, brilliant thoughts and ideas will flash into your brain. Capture these and tweak the speech.
  •  You’ll deliver an A+ presentation. Last minute speeches often sound like last minute speeches.

You may be thinking,  “This sounds great, but I could never do this.”

Yes you can. Move your deadline for having you speech done to four days before your speech. At first you may not always meet the deadline, but at least it will help you get more done.

Apply this good speech writing tip and you’ll take your presentations to a whole new level. It is actually one of the best presentation tips I can give you.

 

 

(C) Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

I was suffering from public speaking embarrassment. For 20 minutes I had walked around the room greeting people. I smiled, made small talk, and burned off some nervous energy.

Seven minutes before showtime, I was slammed with an embarrassing realization.

My zipper was wide open. Have you been there? My mind raced back to the ten plus people I had talked to. How many had noticed? Why had no one said anything? Friends don’t let friends walk around with unknown wardrobe malfunctions!

If I had gone on stage with the blinds open, that could have been embarrassing. Thankfully, I caught it before I went up on stage. However, as speakers it’s very important to check our zippers, our buttons, and anything else that could be a distraction.

Not only will a wardrobe malfunction distract the audience but it can throw us off once we realize it. Every speaker has to recover from this, so don’t feel too bad.

What’s the solution? Do a full body mirror check before you walk into the room. Is your hair fine? Food on the face?

Next, as you are waiting your turn to speak make sure your zipper and buttons are OK. Tuck the shirt in. Consciously do this, so you don’t have to do this on stage. It is hard to speak and be checking your wardrobe at the same time.  

What if you are speaking and notice something is wrong? If you can discreetly fix it, do so. If the audience is well aware of it, make a joke out and keep on going. You could say, “My worst nightmare has come true. (pause for laughter)” Fix the problem and try and work it into your content.

Don’t be caught with your zipper down. Check your wardrobe before you go on stage and you’ll prevent public speaking embarrassment.

(C) Arlen Busenitz – Speakinginfo.com

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website


12 Months ago, I learned about a technique which has forever changed the way I start my presentations. I use this powerful speech technique when I am addressing a few in a meeting or speaking to 325 individuals.

It’s called the “Ed Tate Scan.” Made popular by Ed Tate, the 2000 world champion of public speaking.
Here is how you use it.

When you stand up to speak, wait for 4 to 10 seconds before saying anything. I often count in my head, one-thousand one, one-thousand two, etc.
Is it awkward? It feels that way at first, but it has an interesting effect on the audience.
First, they settle down.
Second, it increases anticipation and maybe some tension in the room.
Third, it makes you look and feel very confident.
After that 4-10 second pause, the audience is primed and ready.
Try it! It’s very powerful and just one way you can Upgrade Your Delivery Skills
Sometime this may not work if you have not been given the floor. You may have to shout to gain it. Otherwise, use it and experience the power.
(C) Arlen Busenitz. All Rights Reserved.



Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

Public Speaking Tip: How to Use a Microphone

A speaker can prepare and deliver a great presentation. However, if people can’t hear the message, it’s like having a table full of pizza and no one able to eat it. The microphone is every speakers friend or worst enemy.

Have you noticed how most people have microphone phobia? They stand too far back or don’t speak directly into it. Do you do this? Unfortunately this can hinder the audience from hearing us adequately.

Here are three public speaking tips for using a microphone properly.

Microphone Tip #1: Test right before the event

Several weeks ago I spoke at an event where the microphone was working 20 minutes before hand, but then was shut off in the back of the room prior to my speech kickoff. To make matters worse, there was no sound person in sight!

What did I do? I spoke a little louder for a few minutes, until the sound person returned. Now, I like to check the microphone 20 minutes before a presentation and again right before the presentation.

Get on the same page with the sound person and run through a live check for volume, etc. This is especially important with hand held microphones as we need to find out how far to hold it from our mouth.

 

Microphone Tip #2: Stand close to the microphone

Many microphones have limited pick up distance. You almost have to eat the microphone. Have you heard the squealing feedback that sometimes comes across a sound system? That actually means you are too far away from the microphone. Move closer so the sound guy can turn down the microphone and reduce the feedback.

Microphone Tip #3: Turn it on

I love lapel mikes. They free up my hands and give me freedom of movement. However, they have two drawbacks:

First, I have to remember to turn them on.

Second, it can make for some interesting and embarrassing moments if we forget to turn them off.

At college their was a professor who forgot to shut off the lapel mike when he went to take a restroom break. Imagine his surprise when he walked back in the room and wondered why everyone was snickering and trying to act normal!

The microphone is a speakers best friend. It helps save our voice and helps the audience listen to our message. Apply these tips and we can make the microphone our friend.

(C) Arlen Busenitz. All Rights Reserved

http://www.Speakinginfo.com

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

Joe, a dark haired college student, came up to me and asked, “What is one of the best best public speaking tips you can give me?”

 
I thought for a moment and gave him a powerful speaking tip that has been very helpful to me.
 
Speaking Tip: Speak to one person only.
 
Whether you are speaking to five people or 993 people you want to speak to one person at a time. This will affect how you and I prepare our talks and how we deliver them.
 
Preparing to Speak to One Person
 
Before you start putting your speech together, pick out an ideal audience member. Someone who represents most of the people in the room.
 
Three weeks ago I spoke to about 50 energetic jr. highers. As I was preparing, I selected another jr higher in the area whom I’ll call Chris. He was a good representative of the audience I was speaking to. I prepared speech as if I was giving it to Chris.
 
I asked myself several questions.
 
  • What problems does Chris have?
  • What would keep Chris’s attention?
  • What info will help Chris?
I kept asking these questions and prepared a customized keynote for Chris. Yes, audiences are diverse and I did seek to add material to target the whole room because of the various backgrounds of the audience.
 
However, by focusing on one person it allowed me give a specific speech tailored for that audience. The result? Great interaction and a keynote that hit home.
Currently I am preparing a business presentation. In my mind I am delivering it to a professional named Jerry. This helps me focus my presentation.
 
Simple principle but very powerful.
 
Here are a few public speaking tips on preparing to speak to one person:
 
  • Select someone you know who represents the audience.
  • Ask yourself, “What would I say if it was just this individual in the room?”
  • Tailor the speech so it appeals to and impacts the diversity of people in the room.
  • Prepare for one, but appeal to all
Why did I encourage Joe to prepare to deliver to one person? Because doing this will help a speaker give a focused speech that connects, impacts, and the audience enjoys.
 
Check out Part 2.
 
(C) Arlen Busenitz 2009.
 

 

 

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

Do you know how to how to make your story come alive?

Last time, we discussed putting the audience in the story. I used the analogy of a 52” HDTV with surround sound.

Continuing with that analogy, you want your audience to be submersed in the story and experience what you are describing

How? Simple.

Story Telling Technique #2: Bring your stories alive by use the 6 senses

Yes, I said six senses. Let me explain.

Back to my opening line:

Come with me to my parents warm family room. A scent of Christmas is in the air. In the corner (I point) is the glowing Christmas tree. The stereo is softly playing "Joy to the World”.

How many senses did I connect with? Three. Smell, sight, and sound. Here is one more example.

Nervously, I walked to the podium. My hands gripped rough edges as I tried prepared to speak from a dry mouth. Tension hung like a heavy fog.

I used touch (gripped the rough edges) and hinted at tastes (dry mouth). Then I used the sixth sense, which I call the “Mood of the Room or the Character”.

What was the mood of the room / character?

Tense!

Your audience can better experience the story when you bring up the feelings/mood of the room or character.

Here are some more examples:

  • The air was filled with anticipation.
  • Sam cheerfully walked up to me.
  • Tension filled the room.
  • I felt discouraged.

Every story you and I tell should connect with the 6 senses. Now, every little story does not need to hit all six. But we should bring them in.

How to connect with all 6 Senses

You and I can ask these questions as we prepare our stories and speeches:

  • What are the characters hearing?
  • What are they smelling?
  • What are they touching?
  • What are they tasting?
  • What are they seeing?
  • What are they feeling or what is the mood of the room?

Remember, you can bring your audience in my saying, “If you had been there, you would have smelled…”

You have heard about how some people are mainly auditory, kinesthetic, and visual? This means that some people really connect with you as you talk about the sounds in your stories. Others connect when you brilliantly paint a picture of the scene. Finally kinesthetics love it when you describe what the characters are doing!

By using all six sense, every person in the room will connect with your story.

Caution! Don’t over due it. Use a couple words to describe the scene and connect wit the 6 senses, but don’t be too detailed. You don’t have to hit all six with every paragraph. More on that later.

In conclusion, you bring your audience into the story with what we learned in Part 1. Next, we use our effective story telling technique #2 and include details which connect with the six sense and create a home theater type experience.

(C)Arlen Busenitz 2009
 

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

What is one of the most important skills a public speaker can master?

Storytelling.

A good story will grab attention, connect you with the audience, and make your point hit home. As speakers it smart for us to learn and use effective story telling techniques.

However, this has been traditionally been one of my weaknesses. Sure, in the past I used stories, but they were like black and white TV with poor signal. The audience heard the facts, but were not drawn in.
 

That’s  not what I want!

We want our stories to be like a 52" HDTV with surround sound. Our audience should be sucked into the story and feel like they are in the scene. Do this and our stories will connect, the audience will be entertained, and our message will stick.

How do we tell great stories?

Over the next few posts, you’ll be learning effective storytelling techniques that will help you and I be a great story teller. Here is the first technique: 

 

Story Telling Technique #1: Put the audience into the speech.
 

Last night at my Toastmaster club, I started with this line:

Come with me to my parents warm family room. A scent of Christmas is in the air. In the corner (I point) is the glowing Christmas tree. The stereo is softly playing "Joy to the World.

Did you picture the scene? Did you feel you were in it? I knew it was a success, when my evaluator said, "We felt like we were there."

Notice how I started? "Come with me…" This invited the audience into my scene.

I learned this technique from Darren Lacroix and Craig Valentine. Both World Champions of public speaking. It is very powerful and effective.

Use these "Invite statements" to draw your audience into the story.

Here are a few other ways to bring the audience into your speech:

– If you had been there…

"If you had been there, you would have seen me dashing out the door."

– Come with me

– Imagine…

"Imagine a spring day…."

– Think about…

Get the picture?

Try this effective story technique and bring the audience in. Have more ideas? Feel free to share them below.

Go to part 2.

(C) Arlen Busenitz 2009

 

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

 Page 11 of 11  « First  ... « 7  8  9  10  11 
Receive Updates on New Posts
106 queries in 0.398 seconds.