Important Public Speaking Tip

Study the famous speakers of the past and present and you’ll find the most use an important public speaking tip. They speak with enthusiasm and passion. Great speakers care about their topic and influencing the audience. We can learn from them and put some fire and passion into our presentation.

Here are three ways to help us speak with passion and enthusiasm:

1. Choose topics you care about.

2. Think about how your message will impact the audience.

3. Act enthusiastic. Control your body and the feelings will follow.

You captivate the audience when you deliver your speech. Use this important public speaking tip and speak with passion and enthusiasm.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Tip #27: Watch the Master Public Speakers

Reading and practice will help you take your public speaking skills to a new level. However, don’t forget to use a very powerful public speaking tip:

Public Speaking Improvement Tip #27: Watch master Communicators in action.

I’ll never forget seeing Zig Ziglar in person. One thing that jumped out at me was his enthusiasm. Whenever I want to update my enthusiasm, I think of Zig. Just watching him helps me improve.

Do you watch the masters of public speaking?

With the age of Youtube, it is now very easy to see master speakers in action. Below are several videos. As you watch them, ask these three questions.

  • What is the speaker doing very well?
  • What can I learn from the speaker?
  • What could the speaker improve on?

You may think this last question is a little odd. Every speaker can improve and watching with a critical eye will help you improve your skills.

 

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Tip #26: Be a Detective–Not Just a Speaker

The phone rang.

“Hello, this is Arlen.”

“Hi Arlen. This is John. We are looking for a speaker on August 12 in the evening.”

“What can you tell me about the event?”

“………”

“Yes, John. My calendar is open. I do have some questions for you.”

“Sure Arlen, go ahead.”

Speech Research Tip #26: Be a Detective and Research your Audience.

Knowing your audience is essential before preparing and delivering the presentation. This knowledge will enable you to connect with the audience and tailor a presentation that hits home.

I may have the same keynote I give to various audiences, but I tweak it depending on if I am talking to Junior highers or retired seniors.

Back to the phone conversation. I asked John a series of questions to get a grasp on exactly who I would be speaking to. This helped me to create a “Chris” and focus my presentation.

  • What is the age of the audience?
  • Why are they at this event?
  • What is the purpose of this event?
  • What are they expecting from the speaker?
  • What can you tell me about them?

These questions enabled me to hit a home run and give a custom tailored presentation.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Recently I was involved in a Toastmaster speech competition. Unfortunately, I did not follow yesterday’s speech internalization tip, and made some major changes the day before. How was I to internalize the speech so I could deliver it smoothly?

I used this next speech internalization tip:

Speech Preparing Tip #17: Mentally rehearse your speech before bedtime.

At 10:45 I delivered the presentation in my living room. Next, I shut the light off, crawled into bed, told my wife I would be concentrating, and rehearsed the speech in my mind. Another alternative of this is to visualize yourself in the front of the room with an audience. Now deliver the speech in the theatre of your mind. Why is this public speaking tip so effective?

I have read various researchers who claim that what you think about before bedtime stays on your mind all night. Plus this is a relaxed learning enviroment.

Try it and see if it works for you. My speech came across pretty smooth and I attribute some of that to how to I internalized my presentation with this tip.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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A couple months ago, I was giving a  7 minute speech presentation at my local Toastmaster Club. If you had been there listening, you would have seen and heard me lose my place 3 minutes into the speech. Awkwardly, I struggled to get back into the speech.

Eventually I did, but long pauses and losing my place are not acceptable in speeches. Why did this happen?

I had failed to properly practice and internalize the speech. There is a difference between a memorized speech and an internalized speech. When your speech is memorized, you know it word for word. You can rattle it off. Problem is that sometimes it may sound memorized. Also, if you forget just one sentence or get distracted, you may find yourself in my situation: struggling to remember the next line.

A better way is to internalize your speech. That way you know it so well, it is a part of you. If you were asked to share about a good experience from your last vacation, you could very easily. Why? It’s internalized. It’s part of you. Every time you deliver it, it may be slightly different, but it comes out natural and you can focus on delivery.

Over the next several days, you’ll be learning several ways to internalize your presentation so you can deliver it smoothly and completely.

Speech Preparing Tip #16: Have your presentation prepared and ready 3 days before you give it.

Imagine you have a presentation to give on Friday. Set a deadline to be ready to give it on Tuesday. Why?

  • As you run through the presentation a couple times over those three days, your subconscious mind will internalize the speech.
  • New ideas will pop up, allowing you to optimize the presentation.
  • Research shows that sleeping on information after we’ve learned it helps put it into long term memory.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Would you like to improve your presentation skills fast? You can with the 9% solution.

Presentation Tip #13: Improve 9% with every presentation. Could you have 9% more vocal variety on your next speech compared to your last speech?

What about:

  • 9% more humor (6 laughs instead of 5)
  • 9% more eye contact (look at just a few more people)
  • 9% more pauses (Pause just 1 second longer than you do now)
  • 9% more passion
  • 9% improvement in stage presence (Move 9% less if you hop around the stage or 9% more if you are like a stone statue.)
  • Etc.

Sure you could. It’s not that hard. Improving just 9% with every presentation means you would double your current skill level in just 9 presentations! Focus on improving in just a couple areas for your next presentation. With these small steps, you will quickly improve your presentation skills.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Yesterday, you learned the power of speaking to one person. Another powerful delivery tip is to use the word “you.”

Compare these two questions:

“How many have been to New York City?”

“Have you visited New York City?”

The second question is much more personal and the audience member will feel like you are speaking to them. After asking this, you would pause to let people mentally answer yes or no.

Presentation Tip #9: Use the word “you” frequently and reword general questions and statements.

Skim through your presentation and insert the word “you” when appropriate. When you get to a general statement or question, ask, “How would I word this if I was visiting with someone in the hallway.” Craig Valentine calls this the hallway test.

We would never say to someone in the hallway, “Who here has vacationed in Mexico?”

Instead we would say, “Have you vacationed in Mexico?”

Notice the difference?

Also watch out for what Darren Lacroix calls the “You / I ratio.” We should be using the word “You” much more than the word “I.”

Use the word “you” frequently and it’ll help you connect with and impact the audience.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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We know we have made a connection when people say, “You were talking right to me!”

How can we achieve this connection? This next speaking tip will help.

Speaking Tip #8: Speak to One Person

Good public speaking is all about having 5 to 8 second conversations with each person. Look at the individual and deliver a thought or a couple sentences. Do this and you will make an incredible connection with the audience. Read more on speaking to one person

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Tip #7: How to Connect with the Audience

Improve Public Speaking Skills Fast - EvaluatingTwo speakers. Same audience. One speaker had the audience’s full attention. They laughed at jokes, groaned on cue, and responded well. The second speaker felt like he was speaking to a painting of an audience. Virtually no reaction.

One speaker made a connection with the audience and the second did not. How can we connect with the audience?

Speaking Tip #7: Connect with the audience through interaction, stories, and a strong intro.

  • Spend time interacting with the audience before the presentation. Some speakers stand at the door and greet people coming. Float around and say “hello.”
  • Have a strong intro that draws the audience in. Consider using the Hook & Reel Intro.
  • Tell stories. Stories instantly connect with the audience. If you lose attention, launch into a story.

Connecting with the audience takes work. Use these tips and it will help you connect next time you speak.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

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Tip #6: 95% of Speakers Make this Mistake

Winston Churchill was a powerful  speaker.  He inspired millions and changed the outcome of history.  He also mastered the power of the pause. The majority of speakers do not use this effectively.

Soon after I started recording my presentations, I realized I was under utilizing this important speaking tip.

Speaking Tip #6: Pause before and after an important point or word.

Pausing causes the audience to reflect. Pausing breaks up the monotony of the presentation. Pausing creates anticipation for the next phrase.

Consider these examples.

The secret to reaching your goals is … persistence …

When it come to holding attention, that speaker is a 10 … out of 100 …

As Winston Churchill Said, … “Never, never, never give up.” …

During rehearsal I will often mentally count ” 1, 2, 3, 4″ when I should pause. This exercise will help make pausing a natural part of your public speaking skills toolbox. You will join the 5% who speak like Churchill.

Arlen Busenitz

Arlen Busenitz is an experienced speaker with over 650 presentations. He is Author of several books, CD's,and creator of Become a Better Speaker in One Evening™

More Posts - Website

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